Monday, January 8, 2007

Stoned Squirrel halfguard escape cycle


First I show the stoned squirrel position without an opponent. I lay on my side (due to the big tail, squirrels can't lay flat on their back) and with my hands as a squirrel. Elbows are kept thight to my ribs.


This position allows me to defend the two most important things my opponent must aquire to control the halfguard: The crossface and the underhook. I use two hands on my opponents bicep to defend the crossface and keeping my elbows prevents him from underhooking me. At all time, I wanna hip out so I'm not lying under him but more next to him. I wanna be on my side and never let him flatten me out.


So, first priority is to defend the crossface and underhook. From there I need to get an underhook myself. When I have the underhook (and still keeping my position, defending the crossface), I now have three ways to escapes.

Firstly, I can try to sit out under my opponent...


...hook my leg around him...


...and take his back.


He might defend this by overhooking my arm. If that is the case, I can do two things, depending on where his weight is.


(Gotta imagine the overhook here, we forgot it on the pic :-D)

If his weight has not changed, I can sit out and drive into him. Sometimes I like to block the far knee with my hand.


(imagine the overhook again)

This is somewhere around where I end up. You will most likely end in his halfguard. Crossface and underhook right away to work your pass :)


If he overhooks and drives his weight into me to prevent me from sitting up, this is what I do instead. I resist so he push his weight into me as much as possible, then quickly underhook his far leg with my left arm, keeping my right underhook tight over his back.


From this position, it is very for me to roll to my right.


Rolling him all the way over.


Get your leg out and pass the halfguard for cross sides position.


Here is a squirrel for inspiration.

1 comment:

Alain said...

Nice demonstration.

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